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After Today, Gorgeous Weather on the Way!

Sticky Later Today, But Gorgeous Weather Tomorrow and to End the Week!

After much of the coastal plain (generally, in those areas located along and east of I-95) picked up a decent dose of rain yesterday, the regional radar mosaic is showing a few showers lining up along a cool front very early this morning... As of this writing, there were showers (little or no thunder was occurring) along a line that extended from northern Maine all the way back into the central Appalachians... And of course, some of the big, coastal cities were either getting some rain as of 3 a.m. -- or were about to see some...

It'll be a good idea to grab the rain gear for this morning's commute, as our latest cool front continues to press eastward across the Northeast and it settles into the mid-Atlantic states... How much progress the front is currently making in upstate New York and across New England does provide us with some clarity on just how long the shower activity will last... For many of the northern and western suburbs of these big cities, which includes northeastern Pennsylvania, northwestern New Jersey and in the Lehigh Valley, all of the rain should end by 9 or 10 a.m. -- then the I-95 corridor will follow 'during midday', or between the hours of 10 a.m. and noon...

The last of these showers, which will probably be accompaniedby some thunder and lightning, because it will be occurring at a time of day when more heating will be involved, will occur in southern Connecticut, on Long Island, at the Jersey Shore and near Delaware and Maryland's beaches between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

With the sun expected to pop out later today, most temperatures will manage to reach the 80s, and most dewpoint temperatures are expected to start falling later this afternoon... Therefore, we'll experience a more comfortable night, with clearing and most temperatures winding up in the 60s... However, some of the typically cooler areas located well inland will be in the 50s at daybreak tomorrow... Rainfall totals will be on the order of 0.10 - 0.25", although any location that gets an isolated downpour before lunchtime could get closer to half an inch of rain... The very moist air mass will be getting scoured out of the Eastern Region though, and that'll set us up for a few sunny and nicer days during midweek...

Tomorrow, as high pressure begins to sprawl out across the Great Lakes and builds into the Northeast, a light wind out of the north will be accompanied by plenty of sunshine... Temperatures will be within a couple of degrees of 80, with some places near and to the south of the Mason-Dixon Line winding up in the lower-80s...

Conversely, there will be some higher elevations / other places located well north and west of the coastal plain that will fail to get out of the 70s... Thursday will be warmer, but still sunny and not all that humid, with most highs in the lower or middle-80s... Right now, Friday appears as if it'll be a very warm "get away day" prior to the Labor Day holiday weekend, but no shower or thunderstorm is anticipated... The holiday weekend will be warm and moderately humid, but we might not see any shower or thunderstorm in the area until Sunday night or Monday...

Moisture associated with "Isaac" isn't going to be in any hurry to spread out across the eastern third of the country, because the moisture is not expected to get picked up by any deep-digging trough or other weather system that will be moving into the eastern states...

As of 2 a.m. EDT, "Isaac" was still a strong tropical storm located in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with maximum sustained winds of close to 70 miles per hour... Having encountered some wind shear over the past 24 hours, or westerly winds aloft which have inhibited any strengthening, "Isaac" is still expected to be upgraded to a hurricane later today... However, it will probably be no stronger than a Category One storm on the Saffir-Simpson Scale, bringing maximum sustained winds of 74-95 mph when it reaches the Louisiana Coast late tonight...

What's interesting about this tropical cyclone is, even though it had a lowest central pressure of 978 millibars as of 2 a.m. EDT, it still wasn't classified as a hurricane... The 'guidelines' of the Saffir-Simpson Scale indicate that a barometric pressure that low would be the equivalent of a low-grade Category Two hurricane, with winds of around 95 or 100 miles per hour... But, the radius of tropical storm force winds extend outward about 205 miles from the center... This implies that the DIAMETER of tropical storm force winds is approximately 410 miles, and that is VERY LARGE for a tropical cyclone...

Therefore, if "Isaac" were smaller, or "more compact" and its wind field was spread out over such a large area, it would be more than just a tropical storm with that kind of pressure value...

Anyhow, we anticipate "Isaac" will reach the Louisiana Coast tonight, but its effects will actually start to be felt later this afternoon, as some of the squalls and outer rain bands begin to reach the coastline... Obviously, a "much weaker than Katrina" entity is encouraging news for New Orleans on the seventh anniversary of its devastation of this city, but the tendency for "Isaac" to slow down in its forward speed (it'll be moving at a rate of less than 10 mph much of the day today) will mean that torrential rain of 10-15 inches will bring serious flooding problems to the Gulf Coast...

Have a good day !!!

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

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